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Allaying Moore’s fears and more with CARE

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The Centre for Applied Research in Electronics (CARE) put on display a wide range of projects and posters on technologies involving multifarious applications of electronics—from the fabrication of miniature circuits to the conservation of endangered species— on the occasion of the IIT Delhi Open House 2016.

The Centre for Applied Research in Electronics, established in 1971, is a specialized division that primarily focuses on research and development in three spheres of applied electronics—microwaves, signal processing and microelectronics.

The Underwater Air and Acoustics Laboratory played host to demonstrations of a computerized system of placing hydrophones—microphones designed to transmit and receive sound underwater—and the implementation of an algorithm for underwater communication. In the past, this lab has worked with the University of Tokyo and the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) India on INCASTS, an acoustic observation system used to monitor the population of the endangered Ganges River Dolphin.

 

One of the primary attractions of the Microwave and Millimeter Wave Laboratory was the peculiar looking anechoic chamber—a specially designed chamber insulated from external electromagnetic waves—used in the testing of antenna radiation patterns. Scores of excited students also learnt about the techniques and devices employed in the photolithographic fabrication of integrated circuits—a process that uses light to etch miniature circuits.

At the Microelectronics Laboratory, a group of PhD scholars presented projects such as a miniature alcohol sensor which could potentially be used as a breathalyzer. There was also a demonstration of a novel photodetector fabricated with nanostructured materials, which unlike conventional photodetectors, is more suited to small scale applications. “The need of the hour is to find alternative technologies since existing Silicon based devices are likely to become obsolete in future, as we approach the limits on miniaturizing circuits”, said Vasi, a PhD scholar presenting the project, echoing the co-founder of Intel, Gordon Moore’s concerns over reaching a point where further miniaturization of transistors may no longer be possible.

Written By : Nayantara Mudur

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